Field Spaniels

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The Field Spaniel Dog Profile

The Field Spaniel is a dog that is both attractive and useful. Their stride is long and low, with a proud and alert head and a wagging tail that isn’t carried high. The Field Spaniel is geared for movement as well as endurance. They have a single, flat or slightly wavy coat that is moderately long and protects them from thorns and water. The look is both solemn and friendly.

The Field Spaniel is a medium-sized spaniel dog breed. They were produced in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as all-black show dogs, and they were unpopular as hunting dogs. However, they were redesigned in the mid-twentieth century as a longer-legged dog that was more suited to field labor. They are now considered an uncommon breed, and The Kennel Club has listed them as a Vulnerable Native Breed.

Their fur is darker than that of other spaniels, and they lack the undercoat that most other field spaniels have. Their coats are primarily solid colors, with small marks on the breast every now and then. They make terrific family dogs and are gentle with children, but they need a purpose, whether it’s hunting or agility practice, to keep them from becoming bored and destructive.

A Field Spaniel’s typical height at the withers is 16–19 inches (41–48 cm), and its weight is 35–60 pounds (16–27 kg).   In terms of size, it falls in between the English Cocker Spaniel and the English Springer Spaniel.  Its coat comes in solid black and liver colors, as well as roan. Tan points, white markings on the throat, and white markings on the chest might be ticked or colored the same as the rest of the body. 

They have a single coat that is moderately lengthy and does not have an undercoat. Fur feathering can be found on the chest, belly, ears, and backs of the legs. The coat is not as thick as that of a Cocker Spaniel, but it does require maintenance to avoid matting in the fur.

A Field Spaniel’s typical height at the withers is 16–19 inches (41–48 cm), and its weight is 35–60 pounds (16–27 kg).   In terms of size, it falls in between the English Cocker Spaniel and the English Springer Spaniel.  Its coat comes in solid black and liver colors, as well as roan. Tan points, white markings on the throat, and white markings on the chest might be ticked or colored the same as the rest of the body. 

They have a single coat that is moderately lengthy and does not have an undercoat. Fur feathering can be found on the chest, belly, ears, and backs of the legs. The coat is not as thick as that of a Cocker Spaniel, but it does require maintenance to avoid matting in the fur.

Field Spaniel Highlights

  • Field Spaniels require regular human interaction; if they are confined to a kennel or left alone in the yard, they will become neurotic. 
  • To avoid timidity and issues with other dogs, socialize them well when they’re young. 
  • They are active dogs who need to be exercised on a regular basis. 
  • They need a secured yard. 
  • Field Spaniels adore water and will play in it wherever they can, including in the house’s water bowl. They’ll join in the fun by delivering water to you as well.
  • However, they love to eat and will steal food when possible. 
  • To get a healthy dog, never buy a puppy from an irresponsible breeder, puppy mill, or pet store. Look for a reputable breeder who tests her breeding dogs to make sure they’re free of genetic diseases that they might pass onto the puppies, and that they have sound temperaments.

Field Spaniel Breed Features & Ratings:
Rated base on a 5 Star Scale
ENERGY LEVEL:                                3 Star
EXERCISE REQUIREMENTS:           3 Star
PLAYFULNESS:                                  3 Star
AFFECTION LEVEL:                           5 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO DOGS:                4 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO OTHER PETS:    5 Star
FRIENDLINESS TO STRANGERS:     3 Star
WATCHFULNESS:                               2 Star
EASE OF TRAINING:                           4 Star
GROOMING REQUIREMENTS:           3 Star
HEAT SENSITIVITY:                              3 Star
VOCALITY                                             4 Star

Field Spaniel Breed Profile:

Dog Breed Group:  Sporting Dogs

Height:  17-18” 

Weight:  35-50 lbs. 

Life Span: 10 to 12 years

AREA OF ORIGIN:  England

DATE OF ORIGIN: 1800s

OTHER NAMES:  Field

Temperament:

Adaptable

Cautious

Docile

Familial

Sensitive

Sociable

Type: Purebred

Activities: 

Hunting, Field Trials, Tracking, Agility, Obedience, Conformation, Therapy

Color: 

Black

Blue Roan

Golden Liver

Golden Liver Roan

Liver

Liver Roan

Litter Size: 4-6 puppies 

Puppy Prizes: Average $2000 – $5000 USD

The Field Spaniel is an uncommon breed that is difficult to come by. The average cost of a Field Spaniel puppy is from $2,000 to $5,000. As being designated as a pet, show, or performance dog does not raise or diminish the quality of the puppy, there is usually no price difference between them.

Field Spaniel Health:

Field Spaniels are typically healthy, however they are susceptible to some health issues, as are all breeds. Although not all Field Spaniels will contract any or all of these illnesses, it’s vital to be aware of them if you’re thinking about getting one. 

There are a few eye diseases to which the Field Spaniel is predisposed. Cataracts, retinal atrophy, and retinal dysplasia are examples of these conditions. 

Hip dysplasia has been found in British Field Spaniel lineages. Field Spaniel breeders should undergo eye testing and hip scoring, according to the Kennel Club and the British Veterinary Association.

According to a health assessment undertaken by the Kennel Club (UK), cancer was the leading cause of death in Field Spaniels, with old age coming in second. The breed’s median longevity was discovered to be eleven years and eight months, which is five months longer than the average lifespan of all dog breeds.

Find a good breeder who will show you health clearances for both your dog’s parents if you’re buying a puppy. Health clearances demonstrate that a dog has been checked for and cleared of a certain disease. Health clearances from the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) for hip dysplasia (with a score of fair or better), elbow dysplasia, hypothyroidism, and von Willebrand’s disease should be expected in Field Spaniels; and from Auburn University for tetralogy of Fallopian Tubes.

  • Major concerns: CHD
  • Minor concerns: otitis externa, hypothyroidism
  • Occasionally seen: heart murmur, patellar luxation, seizures
  • Suggested tests: hip, eye, (elbow), (heart), (patella), thyroid
  • Life span: 12–14 years
  • Ear Infections 

Field Spaniels are prone to ear infections. The ears collect moisture and should be checked on a regular basis.

  • Hip Dysplasia 

The hip joint is compromised as a result of aberrant growth and development in this degenerative condition. This disease can be present in a variety of breeds. Despite the fact that it is a genetic condition that breeders test for, it can be identified in a puppy with healthy parents. It is frequently linked to environmental variables such as poor nutrition or excessive weight increase during puppyhood when it is discovered in such a puppy.

  • Allergies 

In dogs, allergies are a prevalent condition. Food allergies are treated by removing specific foods from the dog’s diet; contact allergies are caused by a reaction to a topical substance such as bedding, flea powders, dog shampoos, and other chemicals, and are treated by removing the source of the allergy; and inhalant allergies are caused by airborne allergens such as pollen, dust, and other chemicals, and are treated by removing the source of the allergy. Inhalant allergies are treated differently depending on the severity of the allergy. It’s worth noting that inhalant allergies are frequently accompanied by ear infections.

  • Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia 

The condition Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia (AIHA) causes the body to attack its own red blood cells, which can be fatal. Jaundice, fainting, pale gums, lips, and eye margins, dark tea-colored urine, lethargy, and a fast heartbeat are all symptoms of AIHA. The blood will have a low red blood cell count when examined. If AIHA is not treated, it will almost always lead to death. Treatment usually entails the use of the steroid prednisone and, in rare circumstances, blood transfusions, and can last anywhere from months to years.

  • Cancer 

Cancer can strike dogs just like it does humans. There are many distinct forms of cancer, and treatment efficacy varies from case to instance. Tumors are surgically removed in some cancers, chemotherapy is used in others, and some cancers are treated surgically and medically.

  • Cataracts 

A cataract is an opacity on the eye’s lens that makes it difficult to see. The dog’s eye(s) will be hazy in appearance. Cataracts are most commonly associated with elderly age and can be removed surgically.

  • Ectropion 

Ectropion is a condition in which the eyelid rolls out or sags, exposing the eye and making it vulnerable to irritation and infection, such as conjunctivitis. If the ectropion is significant, the eye should be surgically corrected; however, in minor situations, no treatment is required.

  • Epilepsy

Epilepsy is a seizure-causing condition that can affect the Field Spaniel. Epilepsy can be managed with medicine, but it is not curable. With correct management of this inherited condition, a dog can live a long and healthy life.

  • Hypothyroidism 

Deficits in the hormone produced by the thyroid gland induce hypothyroidism. Infertility is a modest symptom of the condition. Obesity, mental dullness, lethargy, drooping eyes, low energy, and erratic heat cycles are the most visible symptoms. The dog’s fur is coarse and brittle and begins to fall out, while the skin becomes tough and black. Thyroid replacement therapy can be used to treat hypothyroidism on a daily basis, and it is usually required for the rest of one’s life. A dog who receives treatment on a daily basis can have a full and happy life.

  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) 

A type of degenerative eye disease. The loss of photoreceptors at the back of the eye causes PRA-induced blindness, which is a slow process. Years before the dog shows any signs of blindness, PRA can be detected. A good breeder will have their dogs’ eyes certified by a veterinary ophthalmologist on a yearly basis. 

Field Spaniel Grooming:

There is no undercoat on the Field Spaniel, which possesses a dense, water-repellent single coat. His hair is medium length and can be straight or wavy. Moderate feathering adorns the chest, underbody, backs of the legs, and rear end, but not the masses of fur seen on a Cocker Spaniel. 

The coat is available in black, liver, golden liver, roan, or any of the tan-pointed hues. A small amount of white can be found on the chest or throat of some Field Spaniels. 

The Field Spaniel, joy of joys, requires far less grooming than other spaniel breeds. Brush the coat on a regular basis and bathe it as needed. 

Brush your Field Spaniel’s teeth at least twice or three times a week to get rid of tartar and the bacteria that live inside it. Brushing your teeth on a daily basis is even preferable if you want to avoid gum disease and foul breath. 

If your dog’s nails don’t wear down naturally, trim them once or twice a month to avoid unpleasant tears and other issues. They’re too lengthy if you can hear them clicking on the floor. Because dog toenails include blood veins, cutting them too short might result in bleeding, and your dog may refuse to comply the next time the nail clippers are pulled out. So, if you’ve never trimmed a dog’s nails before, seek advice from a veterinarian or groomer.

Check his ears once a week for redness or a foul odor, which could suggest an infection. To help avoid infections, wipe out your dog’s ears with a cotton ball wet with a moderate, pH-balanced ear cleanser. Do not clean the ear canal; instead, clean the outside ear. 

As soon as your Field Spaniel is a puppy, begin brushing and inspecting him. Handle his paws frequently – dogs’ feet are sensitive — and inspect his lips. Make grooming a pleasurable experience for him, complete with praise and rewards, and you’ll be setting the stage for smooth veterinarian tests and other handling when he’s older. 

Field Spaniel Exercise:

The Field Spaniel is essentially a working field dog, it requires a lot of activity and is best suited to a sporty household. When given the opportunity to run and explore, the Spaniels get happy. However, keep in mind that the Field Spaniel prefers to follow its nose. It will, however, adjust to the family environment with ease.

Field Spaniel Training:

Training, whether for dog sports or good home manners, keeps your Field Spaniel from growing bored and misbehaving. It’s critical to work with the breed’s autonomous nature, which helps it to function so well in the field. You will end up with a happy dog who is a delight to work with if you employ incentive tactics and frequent rewards. Field Spaniels are exceptionally sensitive dogs who do not respond well to hard handling or loud tones of voice.

Field Spaniel Food and  Nutrition:

Although the diet of your Field Spaniel will vary according on its age, sex, activity level, and metabolism, you can anticipate to feed it one and a half to two cups of high-quality dog food every day, divided into two meals. Also, go easy on the sweets. Overfeeding can result in major health problems for dogs, such as obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. 

If you’re not sure how much to feed your dog or believe he’s overweight, your veterinarian can suggest a balanced diet for him.

PROS 

  • Extremely intelligent, which can make training easier
  • Loving and loyal to his family members
  • Low-maintenance grooming, especially compared to other Spaniels

CONS

  • Very high energy with high exercise needs
  • Not recommended for apartments, condos, or other small spaces
  • Floppy ears make him more susceptible to ear infections

Field Spaniel Temperament and Personality:

The Field Spaniel is happiest when he has a job to do. Although independent in nature, he is devoted, sensitive, and willing to please. Generally cheerful and affectionate, he is an excellent family companion as long as he is given regular exercise. The Field Spaniel is especially known for his docile nature. It is typical for a Field Spaniel to be somewhat reserved with strangers.

Field spaniels are friendly, sensitive, and mild-mannered dogs. When it comes to outsiders, they are reserved or even frightened, yet they are completely dedicated to their human friends. 

Even if the field spaniel has some emotional reserve, when given a job to accomplish, the dog is no Casper Milquetoast. These dogs enjoy retrieving and are water lovers. Their natural hunting instincts may lead them to wander. They enjoy being active and, in order to thrive, they require both regular exercise and time with their owners. 

Today’s field spaniel can be an excellent hunter, retriever, and tracker, as well as a devoted family pet.

The Field Spaniel is a lively and curious breed that makes an excellent companion. They may become bored and disruptive if left alone and idle for lengthy periods of time.  They’re good for hunting and dog agility. 

They are very patient with youngsters and prefer to spend time with their loved ones. They get along with other dogs once they’ve been socialized.  They are less hyperactive than Cocker Spaniels and are more placid and independent.  

According to Stanley Coren’s book The Intelligence of Dogs, the breed has above-average working intelligence. 

Field Spaniel Care/Upkeep:

Despite the long, dense hair of the Field Spaniel, grooming is very low maintenance—especially when compared to other Spaniel breeds. Field Spaniels should be brushed and bathed on a regular basis. Remove knots, tangles, or mats with your fingers and a pin brush if your dog develops knots, tangles, or mats. If your dog’s coat is very tangled, consider spritzing it with a light leave-in conditioner spray. 

The teeth of the Field Spaniel, like those of all breeds, should be brushed on a regular basis. Brushing her teeth and gums on a weekly basis is preferable, but brushing once or twice a week can help protect her teeth and gums against oral disease and plaque build-up. In moderation, dental chews are good, but they shouldn’t be your primary source of meth.

Check your Field Spaniel’s ears at least once a week for build-up, debris, or signs of infection, such as redness, swelling, or a foul odor. The floppy ears of Field Spaniels can trap moisture, making them more prone to ear infections. If your dog’s ears are clogged with wax or debris, use a soft cotton towel or pad to gently remove it. Cotton swabs should not be used because they can harm your dog’s inner ear structures or push debris deeper into the ear canal. If your dog’s ears show signs of infection, make an appointment with your veterinarian right once.

Field Spaniels are lively, high-energy dogs, so make sure she gets lots of exercise. Walking your dog on a regular basis, running, or swimming are all excellent methods to exercise her, but games that test her thinking can also keep her active and engaged. Consider obstacle courses, puzzles, and hide-and-seek games. When playing outside, keep your Field Spaniel in a fenced-in area because today’s Spaniels still have a hunting instinct and may chase small animals.

Field Spaniel Relationship with Children and Other Pets

Field Spaniels are fond of children, but noisy roughhousing isn’t their style. As with any breed, always supervise the interaction between Field Spaniels and young children to prevent any ear-tugging and tail pulling on the part of either party.

Field Spaniel Names
RankBoy NamesGirl Names
01MaxBella
02CooperRoxy
03RockyMolly
04JakeSadie
05TuckerLulu
06BrunoRoxy
07TeddyChloe
08ZeusEllie
09LuckyLexi
10HenryEllie

Field Spaniel  History:

Unlike many hunting dogs, the original Field Spaniel breeders in nineteenth-century England favored all-black pups; most hunters prefer dogs with white markings so they can be spotted easily in the field. These breeders, on the other hand, were also showing their dogs. The Field Spaniels’ ability to produce all-black litters made them perfect for dog shows while still preserving their superb hunting abilities.

The Field Spaniel was created for the show ring by competitors who were trying to create an all-black Spaniel.  “Much has been written and said on the purity of the breed; deprecating the means I have adopted to produce them as calculated to alter a presumed type, and frequent missiles have been hurled at me and my dogs from behind the hedge,” Thomas Jacobs, one of the first breeders of the Field Spaniel, said of the origin: “Much has been written and said on the purity of the breed; deprecating the means I have adopted to produce them as calculated to alter a presumed type But where is the pure-bred black spaniel that everyone keeps talking about? There has been no proof of the existence of the pure bred one (assuming there ever was one!). 

They were unpopular with sportsmen since the breed’s dark colors did not show up well in hunting circumstances, and the early breed’s elongated and short shape made it difficult to move through cover.  Phineas Bullock produced the low-slung Field Spaniel from dogs previously owned by Sir Francis Burdett, the secretary of the Birmingham Dog Show. Burdett was rumored to have owned several black Cocker Spaniels. Bullock combined the Field Spaniel with the Sussex Spaniel and the English Water Spaniel to create the English Water Spaniel. In the 1870s, he had great success in the show ring with his Field Spaniel variety; nevertheless, it produced a dog that looked remarkably identical to a Suss.

A Field Spaniel weighed 35–45 pounds (16–20 kg) on average in 1909. The breed was further mixed, with characteristics of the Basset Hound being incorporated. Several genetic health issues occurred, and steps were done to address the difficulties within the breed. The usage of English Springer Spaniels to add healthier qualities into the breed resulted in the longer-legged spaniel we see today. Colombina of Teffont, Elmbury Morwena of Rhiwlas, Gormac Teal, and Ronayne Regal are four dogs from the 1950s that are responsible for the majority of the contemporary breed. 

Even in the United Kingdom, the Field Spaniel is a rare breed. A total of 51 dogs were registered with The Kennel Club in 2009, and the number has steadily increased since then.

Spaniel breeds were once classified based on their weight. A single puppy from a litter was classified as a Field Spaniel if he weighed more than 25 pounds; if he weighted less than 25 pounds, he was classified as a Cocker Spaniel. Breeders didn’t make obvious distinctions between the two breeds of dogs until 1901. 

In 1894, the American Kennel Club registered the first Field Spaniel. A tragic fire destroyed a Field Spaniel breeding kennel a few years later, effectively eradicating the breed in the United States—and another Field Spaniel wasn’t registered with the AKC until 1930.

Three Field Spaniels were brought to the United States in 1967. Although this import, along with a few others, helped to increase the Field Spaniel population in the United States, it is still a very rare breed in North America.

Where to Adopt or Buy a Field Spaniel: 

Because Field Spaniels are rare, finding one at a shelter may be difficult. Look for Field Spaniel rescue groups in your area—they may be able to recommend or assist you in finding a shelter that accepts Field Spaniels. 

It’s critical to engage with a respectable, ethical, and moral breeder if you decide to buy a Field Spaniel from a breeder. Ask a lot of questions and, if at all feasible, go to the breeding facility. Look for evidence of a backyard breeding operation, such as sick dogs or filthy conditions at the location.

More Breeds and Further Research: 

Field Spaniels are great dogs for active families with large, fenced-in yards. Their exercise requirements are high, but their grooming needs are surprisingly low. As always, be sure to do your research and make sure the Field Spaniel is the right pick for your family before bringing him home.

If you’re interested in learning about breeds similar to the Field Spaniel, check out:

  • English Cocker Spaniel
  • Clumber Spaniel
  • Spring Spaniel

All About Field Spaniel:

The field spaniel is a dog without exaggeration, a combination of beauty and practicality, somewhat longer than tall and solidly constructed with modest bone. It walks with a long, low stride, its head held proudly and alertly, and its tail wagging but not high. The field spaniel is engineered for speed and endurance, allowing it to hunt in deep cover or in water. It has a single flat or slightly wavy coat that is moderately lengthy and protects it from thorns and wetness. The look is both solemn and friendly. 

When the Field Spaniel has a job to complete, it is the happiest. Despite its independence, it is devoted, sensitive, and eager to please. It is a wonderful friend who is always joyful and caring.

Fun Facts about Field Spaniel 

  • The field spaniel was developed in England during the second half of the 19th century in an effort to produce a medium-sized, all-black hunting dog that could work equally well on land, in water or in dense cover.
  • Even if the field spaniel has some emotional reserve, when given a job to accomplish, the dog is no Casper Milquetoast. 
  • These dogs enjoy catching and are water lovers.
  • Their natural hunting instincts may lead them to wander. 
  • They enjoy being active and, in order to thrive, they require both regular exercise and time with their owners.

FAQs:

Are Field Spaniels apartment-friendly? 

The Field Spaniel is not suitable for living in an apartment. Indoors, they are moderately active and require at least a huge yard. Because these dogs have strong hunting instincts, it is critical to have a robust fence around your property, as they are prone to flee if they smell something interesting. If you confine this breed to a kennel, it will become quite neurotic. Cool conditions are preferred by this breed.

Are Field Spaniels child-friendly? 

This is a good breed for children because it is known to be lively, energetic, and friendly when they are around.

How much exercise do Field Spaniels need? 

Because the Field Spaniel is essentially a working field dog, it requires a lot of activity and is best suited to a sporty household. When given the opportunity to run and explore, it will be the happy. However, keep in mind that the Field Spaniel prefers to follow its nose. It will, however, adjust to the family environment with ease.